Health Sciences Association of Saskatchewan

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HSAS Mission & History

Mission Statement

Health Sciences Association of Saskatchewan is a Union of professional health care specialists working to improve the economic and general welfare of its members and improving the health care environment for the public.

History

Major dates in Health Sciences Association of Saskatchewan history include:

September 6 – 7, 2012

HSAS holds it second Bargaining Conference with approximately 50 members from across the province.

May 17 – June 25, 2012

“Town Hall” meetings are held across the Province to hear from members issues they are experiencing in their work.

March 5, 2012

The Saskatchewan Government announces it will appeal the decision that the Public Service Essential Services Act is unconstitutional.

February 6, 2012

The Public Service Essential Services Act is ruled unconstitutional by Justice Ball.

November 14, 2011

The lawsuit regarding Bills 5 & 6 is heard in Regina for more than 2 weeks.

October 2011

Certification order comes through to organize 7 mid-wives members throughout the province.

August 2011

HSAS membership ratifies the Tentative Agreement. The new agreement is in place from April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2013.

July 2011

A Tentative Agreement is reached with SAHO.

May 9 – July 7, 2011

HSAS conducts the longest healthcare strike in Saskatchewan history. The effectiveness of this strike is tempered by the Saskatchewan Party’s Bill’s 5 & 6 which are the bills that form the framework for the new Essential Services legislation. HSAS was the first union to strike under the new Public Service Essential Services Act. There were 27 days of actual picket lines throughout the province. Approximately 1000 members were pulled-out on strike.

February 2011

Application was made to the Labour Relations Board to organize midwives in the province.

December 2010

North East EMS was organized by the union. An additional 20 new members were added to HSAS. Collective bargaining on a new agreement begins.

November 2010

Interim President acclaimed as new President at the AGM held in Saskatoon.

June 2010

Non-confidence vote reached by Executive Council. The result was the current President was asked to step down and the Vice-President became the interim President.

April 2010

HSAS Saskatoon expanded offices at current location.

June 2009

Annual strategic planning sessions started for the 1st time at Elbow, Saskatchewan.

April 2009

HSAS Regina expanded offices and moved to a new location on Park Street.

July 2008

Health Sciences is successful in becoming certified to represent Laboratory Technolgists and the Biomedical Technologist employed at Canadian Blood Services in Regina.

May 2008

Health Sciences has their application heard at the Labour Relations Board to represent Laboratory Technolgists and the Biomedical Technologist employed at Canadian Blood Services in Regina.

September 2007

Health Sciences members vote 98% in favor of accepting the 2-year Collective Agreement.

September 2006

Larson House, a detoxification facility in Saskatoon, is taken over by the Saskatoon Health Region. In applying the Dorsey regulations, the Labour Relations Board awarded Health Sciences the (27) Table C professionals employed there; namely, Addictions Counsellors and EMTs. Although Larson House had been organized by SGEU, they hadn’t negotiated a first contract by the time Saskatoon Health Region took it over.

July 2005

In July 2005, facing a 0-1-1% total compensation mandate from the Employer, Health Sciences members vote in favor of Job Action. A settlement is reached in August 2005, with wage increases of 2-2-2%, with another 2% for members on the top step along with other monetary improvements. Job Action is not taken in achieving this settlement.

June 9, 2005

Health Sciences members vote to provide their Negotiating Committee with a strike mandate.

May 26, 2005

Following a six and a half week strike, a first collective agreement was ratified with Crestvue Ambulance Services in Yorkton.

April 4, 2005

A first collective agreement could not be reached with Crestvue Ambulance Services in Yorkton. As a result, strike action began on this day.

August 6, 2003

The Labour Relations Board issues an order certifying Health Sciences as the Bargaining Agent for the non-union support practitioners employed by Kilbach’s Ambulance Services in Esterhazy, a privately owned ambulance service.

March 24, 2003

The Labour Relations Board issues an order certifying Health Sciences as the Bargaining Agent for the non-union support practitioners employed by Crestvue Ambulance Services in Yorkton, a privately owned ambulance service.

Strike of 2002

February 21, 2002
Health Sciences and SAHO sign a tentative settlement providing members a wage increase of 3%, 3% and 3%.

April 7, 2002

SUN and SAHO sign a tentative agreement giving nurses a 20% wage increase using mandate and job evaluation money.

April 16, 2002

Health Sciences Executive Council votes to recommend that the membership reject the tentative agreement.

May 8, 2002

SAHO files a complaint against Health Sciences with the Labour Relations Board alleging that the Union had committed an unfair labour practice by failing to recommend the tentative agreement to its members.

June 5, 2002

For the first time ever in their history, the Health Sciences membership rejects a tentative agreement by a margin of 78%. This settlement had been reached by Health Sciences and SAHO on February 21, 2002.

September 3, 2002

Health Sciences conducts a strike vote. Members vote overwhelmingly (80%) to take job action.

September 5, 2002

The Labour Relations Board grants an injunction at SAHO’s request barring Health Sciences from striking until a decision is rendered regarding the alleged unfair labour practice.

September 16, 2002

The Labour Relations Board decides in favour of Health Sciences finding that the union had not committed an unfair labour practice rejecting every argument raised by SAHO. This cleared the way for Health Sciences to take job action.

September 18, 2002

Health Sciences commenced job action by conducting an incremental withdrawal of services. Negotiations continued with the assistance of a mediator, Stephen Kelleher.

September 26, 2002

SAHO refused to move off their position regarding Market adjustments and Job Evaluation – as a result talks break down.

September 27, 2002

Health Sciences moved to all out strike action taking all members out with the exception of essential services.

October 14, 2002

Mr. Kelleher returns to assist the parties in their negotiations.

October 16, 2002

A tentative agreement is reached and Health Sciences members return to work.

November 19, 2002

Health Sciences members vote 90% in favour of accepting the tentative agreement.
The Health Sciences strike is recorded as the longest health care strike in the province’s history. Our members were rewarded for their determination with significant improvements in wages and a workable method to deal with market adjustments.

August 8, 2002

The Labour Relations Board issues an order certifying Health Sciences as the bargaining agent for the non-union Health Support Practitioners employed by Melville’s St. Peter’s Hospital in the North Valley Health District.

March 13, 2002

The Labour Relations Board issues an order certifying Health Sciences as the bargaining agent for the non-union Health Support Practitioners employed by LaRonge EMS, a privately owned ambulance service.

September 10, 1999

The Labour Relations Board issues an order certifying Health Sciences as the bargaining agent for the Health Support Practitioners in the two [2] newly created northern Health Districts.

April 28, 1998

Health Sciences makes application to the Labour Relations Board to represent approximately 35 Health Support Practitioners in the newly created northern Health Districts of Mamawetan Churchill River and Keewatin Yatthé.

July 22, 1997

The Labour Relations Board issues an order certifying Health Sciences as the bargaining agent for thirty [30] professions employed by Health Districts in Saskatchewan including four [4] health facilities in northern Saskatchewan.

July 14, 1997

Mail in ballots were counted with the following results: Number voting = 1344
Health Sciences votes = 980
SGEU votes = 359
Spoiled ballots = 4
Disqualified ballots = 39
Disputed ballots = 35 [for Board determination]

February 27 – July 3, 1997

Health Sciences and SGEU embarked upon a campaign to convince members of the Health Support Practitioner Unit to vote for them. On April 1, 1997 300 Health Sciences Technologists are transferred without a vote to SEIU.

February 26, 1997

Health Sciences appeared before the Labour Relations Board requesting it hold a hearing over its allegation that implementation of the Dorsey Regulations would result in breaches of the Trade Union Act, Saskatchewan Human Rights Code, Charter of Rights and Freedoms and International Labour Conventions. On March 5, 1997 Beth Bilson, Chairperson of the Labour Relations Board, in a 17 page decision rejected the request.

February 19, 20 and 21, 1997

SGEU’s application to have Dorsey’s Regulations set aside was heard at Queen’s Bench by Justice Pritchard in Regina. Health Sciences, an intervenor in this application, supported SGEU. On March 10, 1997 Justice Pritchard released her 34 page decision dismissing the application. An appeal of her decision was filed by SGEU supported by Health Sciences; however, the Court of Appeal refused to move off of Justice Pritchard’s decision.

February 12, 1997

Barry Nowoselsky, President of SGEU sends a memo to SGEU members in elected positions. This memo is noteworthy as it reveals the backroom deals that were taking place among the unions during Dorsey’s deliberations. For example on page 6 and 7 he states:

After a period of time four unions [SGEU, SEIU, CUPE and SUN] met under the facilitation of Barb Byers, President of the Saskatchewan Federation of Labour. The meetings that Barb Byers facilitated were solely to pressure SGEU to join them in their attempt to ensure HSAS would no longer exist in health care. They felt by joining forces they could slip SGEU a few members from SEIU and CUPE to ensure HSAS would not be included in a vote for their membership. In return SGEU was to give up their Homecare members, Wascana Rehabilitation Centre members, all Nurses and accept the idea of no votes anywhere.

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